UMSON White Coat Ceremony

UMSON White Coat Ceremony


In an inaugural event incoming students
at the University of Maryland School of Nursing took part in a white coat ceremony in
Baltimore that would soon be followed by one in Rockville at both Dean Jane Kirschling explained
the donning of the white coat has been an important milestone for
healthcare students in other disciplines but not in nursing. Until now. Seeking to
increase recognition of nurses’ vital role in partnering with other
professionals in the delivery of health care services schools of nursing are holding
ceremonies. She said it has become important that nurses too
acknowledge a commitment to offer patient-centered humanistic care. At the first event
seventy students received humanism pins were cloaked and took an
oath I solemnly pledge that I will: Consider the welfare of humanity and relief of suffering my primary concerns; Act in a compassionate and trustworthy mannerin all aspects of my care; Apply my knowledge, experience, and skills to the best of my ability to assure optimal outcomes for my patients; Exercise sound professional judgment while abiling by legal and ethical requirements. The group of Clinical Nurse Leader and
Bachelor of Science in Nursing students took over the stage and, afterward, two
shared their personal reflections Applause. It makes me feel like I have a place in the health care system just like any
other doctor or pharmacist and I do believe
that nurses play a major role in the health care system, so this white coat ceremony was a vital aspect in recognizing that. I’ve been doing mangement software about ten years, and five months after my wife and I got married in 2011, she discovered she had had a tumor growing on her pituitary. During the course of that, they decided to do a resection because her peripheral vision had been gone. It was a one percent chance it was not benign. And she ended up having this rare form of bone cancer growing on her pituitary bone. We went through more or less brain surgery even if outside the brain, and so having all these complications going to the emergency room. So I was basically a nurse to her throughout that time, giving her meds every two hours a day at one point. t was more or less a year process kinda going through all that. So she isn’t quite where she was by any means, but she’s been cancer free for over two years now. So by going through all that, being a nurse to my wife, then seeing dozens and dozens of nurses. Just kinda made me reevaluate what I want to do In life. I think I’ve always had a lot of empathy. And a lot of compassion. And I think nursing allows me to help other people fairly often And use those skills and attributes that I have.

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