Inviting bright minds

Inviting bright minds


When I came
from Portugal to Denmark – – I knew it would be
a change of climate. I knew there was going
to be wind, rain and snow. I needed an extra layer of clothes
to survive. My motivation was
that I could work – – in one of the leading countries
in terms of offshore wind. Ramboll was a good option
for starting my career in the field. It’s very fascinating to see the process
from when you sketch something. Maybe one year later, you see
these huge structures out there. As an engineer, it is gratifying
to see your ideas become reality. From an A3 or A4 drawing
to life-size scale. On offshore wind it’s very special,
as they can be taller than Big Ben. When you put a turbine on top,
it can be taller than the Eiffel Tower. Everybody is driven by something,
whether one is an engineer or not. In my case it’s all about
the rewarding effect of believing – – that you’re doing something longterm. You don’t see the effect just now – – but I and my colleagues believe
that what we do – – is relevant for controlling
climate change, for example. I’m in environment and health. I’m in the San Francisco office,
and our office focuses on air quality. I had asthma as a child.
I was a very active kid. I played soccer a lot. Air quality touched me
more than I realised. It was really important to me. We have an exciting social project that
is borne out of a client relationship. It’s with this community group
in the San Francisco Bay Area. It helps the community understand
what the air quality is like. This community is disproportionally
affected by air pollution. We are installing 50
air quality sensors around the city – – on lamp posts and homes
and all over the place. – Make sure to angle the solar panel. In ten years, I’ll look back and say:
“That project changed my life.” It hits so many different elements
of things I’m passionate about. It’s using new technology
and educating people. And it has the social aspect
of training youth – – in a disadvantaged community
with new skills – – so it has a really big impact
in many ways. I’m happy to see the work I do
changing people’s lives. I came to Ramboll
from graduate school – – because I wanted to see projects
unfold in real life. Not just research. That brings me a lot of joy:
Seeing the work I do reflected – – outside of just what is happening
day to day on my computer. I work here in Ramboll as
Division Director for Water Networks. Water as a resource
is something we have to protect. We have to plan for it very well – – so that even in the future
we will have clean water. If you can get your voice heard
about water issues – – your impact will create
sustainable solutions for the future. I like working with Ramboll because
the passion for the values here – – is in line with my own. And I am being believed in
as a leader also. We try to make sure that everyone can
develop and grow here in Ramboll. It gives you a great thrill
when you see a person – – who is quite frustrated
about one type of task in a project – – and you can change
the way they believe in themselves. That is really inspiring. It’s important to me that this company
is owned by a foundation. It makes us more able to do
long-term planning. We have to adjust to the world
that we live in – – and our everyday here
actually makes sense for the future. I’m a design director
here in London. Key focus at the moment
is high-end retail buildings. But I also cover a 50-story building
in Bangkok – – and three 40-story buildings
in Milan – – so I float across different disciplines
and different teams as well. Over the past three years I’ve taken
over the end stage of Tate Modern. I sat in the first design team meeting. Everybody were passionate
about the level of detail – – and they were empowered
to deliver. The collaboration aspect was missing. So I made a statement
at the very start: “You need to listen to
what the building is telling you – – and focus on delivering that.” The thing that gives me the most joy
in my job is probably the end result. But a lot of it is about the process
you go through. You have to follow a rhythm
to get to an end.

Leave a Response

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *